Dysprosium Reduction

Chemical Formula: Dy
Present as: cation

Dysprosium is a chemical element with the symbol Dy and atomic number 66. Dysprosium is never found in nature as a free element, though it is found in various minerals, such as xenotime. Naturally occurring dysprosium is composed of seven isotopes, the most abundant of which is 164Dy.
Dysprosium was first identified in 1886 by Paul Émile Lecoq de Boisbaudran, but was not isolated in pure form until the development of ion exchange techniques in the 1950s. Dysprosium is a rare earth element that has a metallic, bright silver luster. It is soft enough to be cut with a knife, and can be machined without sparking if overheating is avoided. Dysprosium’s physical characteristics can be greatly affected by even small amounts of impurities.
Dysprosium is used, in conjunction with vanadium and other elements, in making laser materials and commercial lighting. Because of dysprosium’s high thermal-neutron absorption cross-section, dysprosium-oxide–nickel cermets are used in neutron-absorbing control rods in nuclear reactors. Dysprosium–cadmium chalcogenides are sources of infrared radiation, which is useful for studying chemical reactions. Because dysprosium and its compounds are highly susceptible to magnetization, they are employed in various data-storage applications, such as in hard disks. Dysprosium is increasingly in demand for the permanent magnets used in electric-car motors and wind-turbine generators. It has high neutron absorption but is less prevalent than gadolinium, ore commonly used for this purpose in nuclear reactors.
Soluble dysprosium salts are mildly toxic, while the insoluble salts are considered non-toxic.

Related Products

CG8

Media Sub Category Strong Acid Cation
Polymer Matrix Styrenic Gel
Ionic Form Sodium
Applications:  

- Softening - Industrial
- Demineralization
- Iron Reduction
- Ammonia Reduction

CG10

Media Sub Category Strong Acid Cation
Polymer Matrix Styrenic Gel
Ionic Form Sodium
Applications:  

- Softening - Industrial
- Demineralization
- Softening - High Temperature

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