Curium Reduction

Chemical Formula: Cm
Present as: cation

Curium is a transuranic radioactive chemical element with symbol Cm and atomic number 96. This element of the actinide series was named after Marie and Pierre Curie – both were known for their research on radioactivity. Curium was first intentionally produced and identified in July 1944 by the group of Glenn T. Seaborg at the University of California, Berkeley. The discovery was kept secret and only released to the public in November 1945. Most curium is produced by bombarding uranium or plutonium with neutrons in nuclear reactors – one tonne of spent nuclear fuel contains about 20 grams of curium.
Curium is a hard, dense, silvery metal with a relatively high melting point and boiling point for an actinide. Whereas it is paramagnetic at ambient conditions, it becomes antiferromagnetic upon cooling, and other magnetic transitions are also observed for many curium compounds. In compounds, curium usually exhibits valence +3 and sometimes +4, and the +3 valence is predominant in solutions. Curium readily oxidizes, and its oxides are a dominant form of this element.
Curium is primarily used is as a precursor to transmute Pu238 used as a power source for space exploration vehicles ad in spy devices

Related Products

CG8

Media Sub Category Strong Acid Cation
Polymer Matrix Styrenic Gel
Ionic Form Sodium
Applications:  

- Softening - Industrial
- Demineralization
- Iron Reduction
- Ammonia Reduction

CG10

Media Sub Category Strong Acid Cation
Polymer Matrix Styrenic Gel
Ionic Form Sodium
Applications:  

- Softening - Industrial
- Demineralization
- Softening - High Temperature

Get expert advise

Need a little help deciding what to do next?
Reach out to us using the link below.